Wayne "The Train" Hancock, Two Tons of Steel

Wayne "The Train" Hancock

Two Tons of Steel

Jason James

Sat, April 29, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$15 - $20

This event is 18 and over

Indoors - Limited Seating. All Minors Will Be Charged an Additional $5 At the Door. General Admission. 17 & Under Admitted with Parent or Guardian Only. $15 advance tickets/$20 day of show.

Wayne "The Train" Hancock
Wayne "The Train" Hancock
Wayne Hancock is that rare breed of traditionalist, one who imbues his retro obsessions with such high energy and passion that his songs never feel like museum pieces he's trying desperately to preserve. Hancock is most often compared to Hank Williams, and he can indeed be a hardcore honky tonker, but there's more to him than that: he also displays a genuine affinity for stomping rockabilly, Western swing, blues, and old-timey country à la Jimmie Rodgers. Plus, he also throws in the occasional pop standard in the manner of Willie Nelson's classic Stardust album. Hancock's devotion to classic country sounds, coupled with his strong aversion to the Nashville hit-making machine, earned him an ardent following among alternative country fans (from both the country and rock sides of the movement), as well as a fair amount of critical acclaim.

Wayne "The Train" Hancock was born May 1, 1965, and began writing songs around age 12. His family moved around a lot during his childhood, and often sang to entertain themselves. Hancock started playing juke joints around Texas as a teenager, and at age 18 won a prestigious talent competition, the Wrangler Country Showdown; however, he was unable to reap the benefits, having just enlisted in the Marines. After six years in the military, Hancock returned to Texas and began playing around the state wherever he could, working odd jobs on the side to help make ends meet. Eventually tiring of his itinerant existence, Hancock moved to West Dallas in 1993, and shortly thereafter settled in the music mecca of Austin. In 1994, he got a part in the musical theater production Chippy, where he performed alongside progressive country legends Joe Ely, Butch Hancock (no relation), Robert Earl Keen, and Terry Allen. He also made his recorded debut on the soundtrack album Songs From Chippy.
Thanks to that bit of exposure, Hancock was able to score a deal with the small Texas indie label Deja Disc. His debut album, Thunderstorms and Neon Signs, was produced by steel guitar legend Lloyd Maines and released in 1995. Critics fawned over the album, particularly the Hank Williams-ish title track, and despite being on a tiny label with limited distribution, it sold over 20,000 copies, mostly through word of mouth. It's success attracted the attention of the somewhat larger indie Ark 21, which signed Hancock for his second album, That's What Daddy Wants. Issued in 1997, the record found Hancock employing elaborate, horn-driven arrangements and delving more deeply into rockabilly and Western swing, which earned some comparisons to the Brian Setzer Orchestra. Reviews were again highly positive, and Ark 21 accordingly reissued Hancock's debut. His third album, Wild, Free & Reckless, had more traditional country instrumentation, full of fiddles and steel guitars, and accordingly was more reminiscent of pre-rock & roll country boogie.

Hancock subsequently switched to the alt-country hub Bloodshot Records, debuting in 2001 with A-Town Blues, which continued the more stripped-down approach of his most recent music. That same year he released the limited-edition EP South Austin Sessions. Hancock dug even deeper into his honky tonk roots with his next album, 2003's Swing Time, recorded live during a two-night stand at the Continental Club in Austin. In 2006, Hancock turned in Tulsa, his third full-length recording for Bloodshot, with Lloyd Maines remaining in the producer's chair. A fourth album for the label, Viper of Melody, appeared in 2009.
—Steve Huey, allmusic.com
Two Tons of Steel
Two Tons of Steel
Before there was Americana, before there was Texas Country, Two Tons of Steel front man Kevin Geil and his original band, "Dead Crickets," rocked a sound that blended the best of musical worlds and pushed the envelope of "Texas" sound with a signature brand of high-energy country meets raw punk.

The San Antonio-based group packed the small bars and local hangouts and quickly became the Alamo City's most-loved band, earning them a spot on the cover of Billboard Magazine in 1996. It was the beginning of a twenty year journey for Geil and the 4-piece ensemble.

Releasing "Two Tons Of Steel" in 1994 and "Crazy For My Baby" in 1995 on Blue Fire Records, a sponsorship deal with Lone Star Beer quickly followed. Dead Crickets, renamed Two Tons of Steel in 1996 began traveling outside of Texas, including stops at the Grand Ole' Opry in Nashville, Tenn., the National Theater in Havana, Cuba, and European tours, to greet fans who had embraced their Texas-born sound. In 1996 they released "Oh No!" on their independent label, "Big Bellied Records." They followed up the passion project with a live recording at the legendary Gruene Hall in Gruene, Texas, taped during a Two Ton Tuesday Show 1998.

In 2013, the band marks 18 years of "Two Ton Tuesday Live from Gruene Hall." The summer-long event drew 13,000 fans in 2012 and more than 150,000 fans since it began its annual run in 1995.

The popular concert series was captured in "Two Ton Tuesday Live," a DVD-CD combo released on Palo Duro Records in 2006. Also that year, the band's first national release, "Vegas," produced by Grammy Award-winning producer Lloyd Maines on the Palo Duro label, took them to No. 7 on the Americana Music Charts and was one of the top 20 releases of 2006. Two Tons released "Not That Lucky" in 2009. The album peaked at No. 4 on the Americana Music Charts and has made Two Tons of Steel a band to watch in 2013.

Along the way, the band has collected a number of awards. To date, Two Tons has cleaned up at home, winning "Band of the Year" on 12 separate occasions and "Album of the Year" for its self-titled debut. Two Tons has also been named "Best Country Band" by the San Antonio Current ten times. Geil also has nabbed 'Best Male Vocal' honors four times.

Two Tons of Steel's reach extends beyond their live gigs. In 2003, the band was filmed during a "Two Ton Tuesday" gig for the IMAX film, "Texas: The Big Picture," which can be seen daily at the IMAX Theatre in the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin and has been seen as far away as Japan. The band also has been featured as supporting characters in award-winning author Karen Kendall's romance novel, "First Date."

Two Tons Of Steel, Kevin Geil, Jake "Sidecar" Marchese on Upright Bass, Brian Duarte on Lead Guitar and Paul Ward on Drums continues to push the line between country and punk with its next project "Unraveled" produced by Lloyd Maines, due out July 2, 2013.
Jason James
Jason James
Up and coming Texas artist Jason James is here to bridge the gap between the red dirt music we enjoy and the classic country we love.

Elements of country, honky tonk and blues are prevalent and flawlessly executed giving listeners a unique opportunity to experience a sound not yet heard on the Texas scene.
Venue Information:
John T. Floore Country Store
14492 Old Bandera Rd.
Helotes, TX, 78023