KJ97 Cares For Kids Concert, Cody Johnson, Kane Brown, David Lee Murphy, Dylan Scott, William Clark Green & Mike Ryan

Sold Out: KJ97 Cares For Kids Concert, Cody Johnson, Kane Brown, David Lee Murphy, Dylan Scott, William Clark Green & Mike Ryan

Wed, March 14, 2018

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm


This event is 18 and over

All ticket proceeds go to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Outdoors - Standing Room Only. All Minors Will Be Charged an Additional $5 At the Door. Rain or Shine Show. General Admission. 17 & Under Admitted with Parent or Guardian Only. $20 Advance/$25 Day of Show

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Cody Johnson
Cody Johnson
In an time of synthetics and plastics, folks appreciate the real thing. Musically, we look for songs that reach beyond our eardrums, touching our hearts. Cody Johnson's unique blend of Country and Rock does just that.

Many Texas Music fans met Cody Johnson's honest style through the radio singles from his Six Strings, One Dream album: "Nobody to Blame" (#6 on the Texas music charts in 2009); #1"Pray for Rain" (2009 - 2010); and "Texas Kind of Way" (#6, late 2010 – 2011).

At first opening for other artists, Cody has also taken the Texas dance-halls by storm. Increasingly, the Cody Johnson Band is the attraction, and an honest-to-goodness one.

Cody's childhood, though, was different from his rowdy onstage personality. Growing up, home was Sebastopol, a speck on the East Texas piney woods map, the perfect setting for that country boy to roam the woods, hunt, and fish. Home-schooling and family times around the piano provided the kind of life the kind many folks envy. Even Cody's music training started when dad Carl taught him the chords to "I'll Fly Away," a Southern Gospel favorite.

Starting public school as a freshmen, Cody expanded beyond playing the guitar and drums at church. When his "ag science" teacher overheard Cody playing an original song, he convinced Cody to form a band with other FFA (Future Farmers of America) members. A few months later, Cody's band placed "runner-up" in the highly competitive Texas State FFA talent contest.

Cody left the contest realizing he was in love for life: in love with the music, the crowd, and the energy of performing onstage. Beginning in small honky-tonks and bars, he tried different musical styles. Discarding many, today Cody's shows still keep a Garth Brooks-level of energy and a Ronnie Van Zant - outlaw dedication to individual style. Like the late Chris LeDoux's musical beginnings, "CoJo" sold his acoustic CDs from the back of his truck during three years of bull-riding. Cody still shows up today as the true cowboy he is.

After graduation, Johnson worked for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in Huntsville. There, supervising prison inmates, Cody confides, "I developed an even greater appreciation for family and friends. Seeing how easy it was to go to prison set me on the 'straight and narrow'."

Also in Huntsville, Cody met Nathan Reedy, who became his new drummer. With Carl Johnson playing bass, the trio began traveling as the Cody Johnson Band. Their first CD, Black & White Label, provided funding for travel and radio promotion - and the assurance that the music dream was real.

Along the way, several popular artists have shared their friendship, fans and wisdom with Cody. Some had business advice and warned him of issues musicians face on the road. The common thread is that other professionals respect Cody as performer, songwriter and individual. In turn, Cody Johnson earns that respect, giving as much effort to an audience of 30 or 30,000. As he states, "I like the crowd to sing along, yell, or whatever makes them feel part of the show. I love big crowds because of the energy and showmanship I can exhibit. I love acoustic shows because of the intimacy and how candid they are. Acoustic shows are like sittin' around the living room 'pickin' and grinnin'."

Winning the Texas' Regional Music Awards as "New Male Vocalist of the Year, 2011," caused Cody to choose whether leave the security of State employment to chase his dreams. So he followed his own advice to "Always pray for direction, and know that no matter what..., the good Lord has a plan."

The answer to that prayer came when Cody's wife Brandi gave her "thumbs-up." As Cody puts it, "When the woman I love - and plan to spend the rest of my life with - told me that she 'stands by her man' and believes in me 100%, I believed even more confidently that I could live my dream. Though I've had lots of people believe, contribute, push and pull me along, no one's efforts affected my decision emotionally the way Brandi's faith in me did."

Cody indeed left his "day job" for the more-than-full-time music career. But, that'swhere the story really begins.

Expanding his boundaries beyond Texas, he flew to Nashville to record a new CD with Nashville studio musicians hand-picked by his "big brother," Nashville-based fellow Texan, Trent Willmon, producer of the new album, A Different Day (released October 31,2011).

Though new to Nashville recording ways, Johnson's musical confidence showed in the Music City recording studio. Together, he and the studio musicians tweaked songs to obtain the exact intended effect. Listening to the Music City veterans, Cody adopted suggestions when they felt right, and would "hang tough" when he felt the music differently.

According to CoJo, "I don't want to be labeled as 'Texas' or 'Nashville.' I am me: Texas, outlaw, cowboy, country, and a God-fearing man using the gift He gave me."

-Billie Willmon Jenkin
Kane Brown
Kane Brown
American country music singer and songwriter, born 21 October 1993.
David Lee Murphy
David Lee Murphy
Country music singer - songwriter - guitarist
Born on 7 January 1959 in Herrin, Illinois, U.S.
Dylan Scott
Dylan Scott
Dylan Scott Robinson (born October 22, 1990 in Bastrop, Louisiana) is an American country music singer and songwriter, better known by his stage name Dylan Scott. Scott is signed to Curb Records.

Scott's debut single, "Makin' This Boy Go Crazy", was released in June 2013. Billy Dukes of Taste of Country gave the song three and a half stars out of five, writing that "the native Louisianan can really rumble when he reaches down to hit the low notes, but his performance won’t leave female fans tingling like the greats."It charted for 10 weeks on the Billboard Country Airplay chart, peaking at number 54 in April 2014. The song's music video premiered on CMT in December 2013.

Scott's second single, "Mmm, Mmm, Mmm", was released in July 2014. Markos Papadatos of Digital Journal gave the song a B+ rating, writing that "the song has a Jake Owen meets Colt Ford vibe to it, especially since he displays his smooth baritone and rap vocals."

Both songs are included on his extended play, Makin' This Boy Go Crazy, which was released on February 11, 2014. The EP was produced by Jim Ed Norman. It peaked at number 50 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart.

Scott released his debut studio album, self-titled Dylan Scott, in August 2016. It debuted at number five on the Top Country Albums chart, selling 9,000 copies for the week.
William Clark Green
William Clark Green
William Clark Green
Ringling Road
William Clark Green Is not one for pulling punches. Where some songwriters trade in subtlety
and dancing around blunt truths with clever feints and metaphor, Clark aims his words straight
to the point and, when needed, right through the heart. His music is unrelentingly direct and
hard-hitting, too, charged with a palpable rock ’n’ roll immediacy that’s as evident in his most
intimate solo acoustic performances as it is in the full-tilt band shows that have packed rooms
across his native Lone Star State from the Blue Light in Lubbock to the world’s biggest honkytonk,
Billy Bob’s Texas in Fort Worth. And with the April 21st release of Ringling Road, his
eagerly awaited fourth album, Green is set to make his biggest impact on the booming
Texas/Red Dirt music scene — and beyond — yet.
But just don’t call him the “Next Big Thing,” because as Green makes patently clear on Ringling
Road’s riotously myth-busting opening track, that’s a laugh, buddy. And even with tongue firmly
in cheek, William Clark Green is only interested in being real.
“Oh it’s hard to pay your dues when there ain’t no money in the bank
It’s a shame
I gotta make it to the show but there ain’t no gas in the tank
It’s insane
what you do for a broken heart and some busted strings
And everybody saying I’m the next big thing!”
“I’m actually a little nervous about what people are going to think of that song, and if they’ll think
I’m being an asshole,” Clark admits with a laugh. “And that’s not the case at all, because it’s
actually sarcastic as hell. But we’ve been hearing that ‘you’re the next big thing’ thing for a long
time now — and I’m guilty of saying the same to some of my songwriter friends who are
struggling out there, too. And even though it’s always meant in a nice way, you can’t help but
think, ‘What? I have no idea what you’re talking about. I’m actually sleeping in my truck tonight!”
Not that he’s complaining. Green is nothing if not fully committed to his chosen path. Granted,
had a few chips fallen a little differently, he could have just as easily — and happily — devoted
his life to ranching, but fate dictated pretty early on that he was meant to be a troubadour. He
may have started taking guitar lessons at 13 primarily out of boredom — his family had just
moved from Flint, Texas to College Station in the summer, and he didn’t have any new school
friends yet — but it wasn’t long before he developed a keen interest in songwriting. A healthy
obsession with his father’s copy of Willis Alan Ramsay’s classic 1972 debut had a lot to do with
that (“That’s still the best album I’ve ever heard, and the reason I use three names,” Green
enthuses). So did timing: “I remember seeing Robert Earl Keen and Pat Green and even Jerry
Jeff Walker at the Wolf Pen Creek Amphitheater in College Station when I was in high school,”
he says. “The scene was really kind of in its birth then, and I was right there in the middle,
paying attention and really intrigued by all of it.”
College originally wasn’t part of his game plan — “I was a very poor student, and I still wanted to
be a cowboy” — but after a lead on a ranch-hand job fell through and a miserable two-week stint
at a feed lot scared him straight, Green enrolled in junior college and eventually found his way to
Texas Tech. He majored in agriculture economics, but spent more time songwriting and playing
guitar at every open-mic night and hotel bar gig he could find than actually studying. By the time
fellow Red Raider and Texas country rising star Josh Abbott handed him the keys to his
Tuesday-night residency at the Blue Light, Green and his own band were on their way.
“That’s when things got really serious for me,” Green recalls. “I came out with my first record
[2008’s Dangerous Man], and it kind of got to the point where I knew if I was going to pursue
music, I’d have to give it everything I had, because there’s just no room for half-assing it in this
business. School went to the wayside — I ended up graduating, but it took six years because
music was my priority. And here I am now at 28 — about to release our fourth album and hoping
to get to five before I’m 30. That’ll be a pretty quick turn around, but that’s the goal.”
The aforementioned “next big thing” rumors started up in the wake of his second album, 2010’s
Misunderstood, but it was 2013’s Rose Queen that proved his real breakthrough. Green
recorded the album, produced by Rachel Loy in Nashville, at a real crossroads in his career —
with momentum and high expectations at his back but barely enough money in the bank to foot
the bill (and that only after a desperate call for help to angel investor Wade Bowen saved the
day). “It was a huge leap of faith,” Green says today, “but I told the band, ‘We’re going to pull out
all the stops, and we’re going to find a way to make exactly the record we want to make and
need to make.” The end result was a triumph, yielding Green’s first three top-10 Texas Radio
hits, including two chart-toppers in “She Likes the Beatles” and “Hanging Around” (the former
also won “Song of the Year” honors at the fan-voted Lone Star Music Awards).
Of course, all of that set the bar even higher for the follow-up — and Ringling Road delivers in
spades. Returning to Nashville to team once again with Loy (Green calls working with the gifted
up-and-coming producer “the best decision I’ve ever made in my musical career”), the band
overcame a a couple of early setbacks — longtime drummer Jay Saldana had recently left for a
new gig with Wade Bowen, followed by guitarist Steve Marcus breaking his arm a week before
they went into the studio — to come through like champs under pressure. Saldana ended up
coming back as a guest to drum on most of the record (along with new band member Ryan
Garza), while the lead guitars duties were initially shared between Nashville session vet Kenny
Greenberg and band friend Josh Serrato, recruited out of fellow Texas band Six Market
Boulevard for what originally supposed to be “fill-in” duty. By the time Marcus’ arm healed up
enough for him to join the sessions halfway through, though, Serrato had been promoted from
temp to full-time band member. Greenberg ended up staying on for the rest of the record as
“All three of those guys are monster talents on guitar, so It was a really incredible experience to
have them all working with each other in the studio,” Green marvels. “It all just happened the
way it was supposed to, and we weren’t going to get in the way of that!”
With that formidable triple-guitar threat augmented by Green on acoustic, seasoned band
member Cameron Moreland on bass and key assists from Loy and others on background
vocals and a few other instrumental tracks, it’s no wonder that Ringling Road boasts the fullest
sound of any WCG album to date. But as has been the case since day one of Green’s career,
it’s the quality of his songs that ultimately makes the boldest statement. And it’s not just the flatout
rockers (“Next Big Thing”) and irresistibly catchy, up-tempo numbers (“Sticks and Stones,”
“Creek Don’t Rise,” “Going Home”) that hit hard, either. Other highlights include “Old
Fashioned,” a stirring elegy for a bygone Texas (“The interstate’s pumping just like a vein full of
California license plates”), and the uproarious, Todd Snider-worthy title track, which takes its
name from a real road in Green’s current hometown of Eastland, Texas. Back in the day, the
Ringling Bros. Circus used Eastland as a regular resting stop between shows, where the
elephants and other animals were let off the train for a drink and the myriad circus folk would
unwind and do whatever circus folk usually do on their nights off. As colorfully imagined by
Green and co-writers Ross Cooper and Randal Clay, that was a helluva lot more wild and
entertaining than the actual ticketed performances.
“Ross is a good friend of mine from Lubbock, and Randal is a guy he met in Nashville who was
actually a roustabout for 10 years,” Green explains. “I mean, what better way to write a song
about the circus than to write it with a guy like that? Randal brought in a lot of truths about what
really does happen behind the scenes in the circus. To be honest, after I told them about
Eastland and the history of Ringling Road, he and Ross just got going on this tangent that was
so good, I kind of just sat back and was like, ‘keep going!’”
“Ringling Road,” the song, may be a freak-show blast, but the rest of the album is hardly all fun
and circus games. “Final This Time” is a devastatingly frank post-mortem of a divorce Green
witnessed between two close friends. “Fool Me Once” and “Hey Sarah,” two of the three songs
(along with “Sticks and Stones”) that Green wrote solo, are unflinching accounts of his own
firsthand experiences at bad (or at least uncertain) love. And the lead single “Sympathy”
(already a No. 1 on Texas radio) offers anything but sympathy to a former lover looking for a
shoulder to cry on.
Most brutal of all, though, is the hauntingly plaintive “Still Think About You,” in which the kind of
sympathy Green does offer an ex comes laced with painfully bitter honesty: “Sorry that you fell
in love with someone you could never inspire …”
“You know, it’s not that I’m an asshole,” Green says again, laughing. “But I feel like everybody
has those selfish feelings sometimes, but they’re never said in songs. I actually showed that
song — I had the chorus written but still needed the verses — to Randy Rogers and Sean
McConnell, and they both went, ‘oh, that’s not my style.’ And I thought, ‘Well, maybe this is a
terrible idea …’”
Before giving up on it, though, Green showed it to one other trusted friend: Kent Finlay,
songwriter’s songwriter, founder of the legendary Cheatham Street Warehouse in San Marcos,
Texas, and, not for nothing, Green’s co-writer on Rose Queen’s hit single “Hanging Around.”
Sage soul that he was, Finlay — who sadly passed away on March 2, 2015 after a long illness
— took a shine to the unfinished song at first pitch.
“I took it to Kent and said, ‘I’ve got this song, and no one seems to like it,’” Green recalls. “But I
played what I had for him, and he went, ‘Oh, I like that!’ And I was like, ‘Thank God, finally
somebody does!’ So we ended up finishing it together, and I’m really glad we did.
“Taking uncomfortable feelings like that and putting them to paper and writing songs about them
— that’s kind of been my staple, really,” Green continues. “And that song is about as true as it
He pauses on that thought for a moment. “Now, I don’t know if that’s a good thing or a bad
thing,” he adds with a laugh, “but I guess the truth prevails! And that makes me able to sleep at
Mike Ryan
Mike Ryan
Mike Ryan is a singer/songwriter with a knack for pairing lyrics with music that breathe life into a song. Though Mike would tell you “I’ve still got some road to travel as a writer,” many will argue he’s already established himself when it comes to penning clever new tunes. Smooth and soulful, he has uncommon vocal ability. With the upcoming release of his sophomore album, Bad Reputation, Ryan proves his ability to craft a good lyric in addition to breathing life into a song in a way that no other voice can.
Surrounded by the musically inclined from a young age, Mike’s never been a stranger to notes or rhythm. Early on, Mike was greatly influenced by his grandfather Paul, who directed the Texas National Guard Band for over 20 years. “Gramps was the first person to teach me about the relationship between love and music,” says Mike. “He was very passionate about making music, as well as teaching it, and that passion was infectious.” Additionally, two of Mike’s uncles are currently band directors and Mike’s Father, Ted also has a passion for music and the performing arts. “I have great memories of my dad performing in plays and musicals as I was growing up,” Mike recalls, “and he still plays bass with his blue grass band every time he gets the chance.” Mike honed his own talent early as a member of his middle school and high school choirs.
The talent Mike has been blessed with as singer/songwriter has certainly not been ignored. After releasing his first full length album in the Fall of 2012, Night Comes Falling, Mike grabbed the attention of Sea Gayle Music, one of the top independent publishing companies in country music, out of Nashville, Tennessee. Mike strengthened his team again with APA Talent of Nashville coming on board to oversee tour booking in January of 2014.
Since May of 2013, Mike frequently travels to Nashville for writing sessions. Mike’s second full length album, Bad Reputation, showcases ten new songs, all written or co-written by him. The songwriting and vocal talent that so many have come to recognize shine brilliantly with this new project. The first single, “Dancing All Around It,” (went #1 on the TX Music Chart 9.29.2014) grabs you with the first line and keeps you hooked as the story unfolds. “Easy,” reminds you of the smooth classic country hits of the 80’s, and “Wasting No More Whiskey” (#1 on TX Regional Radio Chart 4/3/2015)is a creative and catchy tune that will have you singing along before its over. “I had some trouble narrowing it down to just 10 songs out of all the new ones we had written, but that’s a nice problem to have,” says Mike. “It’s a great feeling when you have more good songs than space on an album.”

With the first two radio singles from the BAD REPUTATION album both hitting number 1 on the Texas charts, its evident that Mike Ryan knows a thing or two about good music. His rapidly expanding fan base is solid evidence of that.
Venue Information:
John T. Floore Country Store
14492 Old Bandera Rd.
Helotes, TX, 78023